HRV patterns using Heartmath’s emWave

A question we often hear from new users is ‘What do all those colors on the graph mean?

Occasionally you may see that the black line on the graph suddenly becomes red or blue as it moves across the screen. The black line shows the pattern of the Heart Rate Variability (HRV) that the emWave sensor measures.

HRV is the time interval between the heartbeats. Every little moment between each beat is different from the next and is constantly speeding up and slowing down. However, when we are stressed, this speeding up and slowing down is not happening in a consistent manner. If you see this pattern being created on the screen, it will look very jagged and irregular.

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Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement. Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and irritable bowel syndrome seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor. Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

Read the full article. PDF reader required.

Which Heartmath product is best for me?

A question we receive often is, ‘what are the differences between the HeartMath products?’ If you are the lucky owner of both the Inner Balance™ Sensor and emWave® programs, you truly have the best of both worlds. But if you are choosing between the Inner Balance Sensor and emWave products, here are some thoughts that may help you decide.

  • First, and most important is what are your goals?
  • Second, is the program just for you or would others use it as well?
  • Last, when do you think you’ll use your program most often?

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Heart Rate Variability with the Inner Balance

A question we often hear from new users is ‘What does the wave at the top of the session mean?’.

That wave is your Heart Rate Variability or HRV .

HRV is the time interval between the heartbeats. Every little moment between each beat is different from the next and is constantly speeding up and slowing down. However, when we are stressed, this speeding up and slowing down is not happening in a consistent manner. If you see this pattern being created on the screen, it will look very jagged and irregular.

Read more…

Heart rate variability biofeedback: how and why does it work?

In recent years there has been substantial support for heart rate variability biofeedback (HRVB) as a treatment for a variety of disorders and for performance enhancement. Since conditions as widely varied as asthma and depression seem to respond to this form of cardiorespiratory feedback training, the issue of possible mechanisms becomes more salient. The most supported possible mechanism is the strengthening of homeostasis in the baroreceptor. Recently, the effect on the vagal afferent pathway to the frontal cortical areas has been proposed. In this article, we review these and other possible mechanisms that might explain the positive effects of HRVB.

Read the full article here

How Emory University Counseling and Psychological Services’ Dana Wyner uses biofeedback

We are often asked by counselors in counseling programs how they can incorporate biofeedback in to their counseling programs.  Helping students cope with stress and offering an avenue for counseling services is a very valuable commodity to any university and its student body. Dr Wyner and Emory University have an excellent counseling program at Emory and asked her Emorys’ model This is from the desk of Dr Wyner:

This is the core of the letter that I send to counseling center psychologists who ask me how we run our program…

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Emory University Student Counseling Program Helping Students Cope with Stress

Great article about the student counseling program at Emory University. See the full story below.

“As the calm and collected overseer of Eagles at Ease Stress Management Services, Dana Wyner ’04 PhD encourages her clients to take a mental mini holiday, go limp like JELL-O and feel snug as a bug in a rug.

Those practical lessons for relaxation on the go are particularly helpful during exam time, when nerves are frayed and performance anxieties go into overdrive.

The Student Counseling Center Stress Clinic, funded by Emory’s new mental health fee, sees more than 30 students each semester for issues such as test-taking anxiety, phobias, insomnia, difficulty concentrating, headaches and hypertension. Services include helping students develop a personalized toolbox of positive coping strategies, small group training in relaxation skills and biofeedback, and individualized therapy sessions.”

Read the full article at Emory.edu